Join us In-Person for our OKC Chapter Luncheon Wednesday, August 10th!

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Join us In Person for our OKC Chapter Luncheon, Wednesday, August 10th, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm!

Where: First Americans Museum (FAM)
659 First Americans Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73129
FAM Theatre Room
Member Cost: $20
Non-Member Cost: $25
Please RSVP by COB on August 8th, **Late RSVPs may not include lunch**
Questions? Contact Kendra Bennett, 405-420-2731, kbennett@reagansmith.com
Topic: Native Voices, Native Votes
Speakers: Alison Black, President, Oklahoma Council for Indian Education and LaRenda Morgan, Governmental Affairs Officer, Executive
Office of the Governor for the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma

About the Speakers:

Ms. Alison Black is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.
She is president of the Board of Directors for the Oklahoma Council for Indian Education

(OCIE) and she was recently elected to the National Indian Education Association's Board of
Directors. She is also passionate about social justice issues and serves on the Board of Directors
for the Oklahoma Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as the new Vice-
President. She speaks and writes publicly against the use of Native mascots, regularly educates
school districts and others about Title VI, and believes in the power of building community.

Ms. LaRenda Morgan is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.
She is also Otoe Missouria. She has worked previously for Indian Health Service Oklahoma
City Area Office, The Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma State Department
of Mental Health & Substance Abuse Services. She has previously served as Cheyenne and
Arapaho Tribes Executive Director of Social Services and is currently the Governmental Affairs
Executive Officer for the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in the Wassana Administration. She
currently serves as a Chair for Cheyenne Arapaho Missing & Murdered Indigenous People
Chapter. She played an integral part in working to get Ida’s Law passed in Oklahoma for the
native families and victims who suffered from the missing and murdered indigenous people
epidemic.